Day 29 – Are we behind the curve?

Like I said before, Sam goes to quite a few classes – Monday music class, monday and tuesday an hour extra primetime in school (now that it is winter and he cannot play outdoor)for Chess and Lego robotics, saturdays are for ice skating. We plan to also get him to start swimming come February. Ofcourse the spring soccer in April.

All these classes are as a hobby. Neither hubby nor me think much about this. Even Karate, soccer and swimming are more of something that can help him get rid of the excess energy and we keep thinking of such activities for him. We are not very keen on sending him to Kumon or Russian math or any other language classes or for that matter art because a. we know he does not have interest in sitting through art class b. these classes feel more educative and again class room-ish than fun and activity.

But, we see a lot of parents who do kumon and math classes. The parents take these classes more seriously than the kids and driving them around 2-3 days a week. All 5 days have some class or the other where as we have wed,thur and fri free. Infact we try to keep the weekend free too for purely selfish reasons that we don’t have to drive him anywhere or we can make other weekend plans.

We have never considered these activities as competitive sport either. Swimming is a life-skill we think and skating is fun. Soccer is something all kids do here and you know…while in Rome…When we meet and hear other parents talking about how the kids are performing and what next- oh! this club for soccer and this for swimming and we want them to compete… I wonder – Are we behind the curve? We never tell Sam to be competitive, we always only tell him to do his best and enjoy the sport. It is ok if he is not the best. And I am wondering today, after another such discussion, are we not telling him the right thing? Should we tell him to be competitive and push and rush and enter the race?

 

I am very confused right now and taking this to bed with me…Good night!

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6 thoughts on “Day 29 – Are we behind the curve?

  1. I have been itching to do a post on similar lines after reading Maya’s and now your post makes me want to write my perspective about it.

    For me personally, I think what you are doing is right. I believe in letting the kids enjoy what they are doing. Forcing them to be competitive robs them of a carefree childhood I feel. Same pinch on trying to avoid weekend classes due to self convinience πŸ˜€ I have never got bothered by competitive pushy parents and their idelogies until I watched Dangal. I felt that the girls would not have achieved what they have had the father not compelled them to take wrestling seriously. I did wonder if we are not right in taking things easy. But then I don’t think we would be able to be that kind os parents ever!

  2. KB

    Hey! Happened to visit the blog today & I see so many updates. Music classes?! I didn’t know that! Does he like it? I will visit again to look at other posts..

  3. If you have a competitive kid, HE will tell you what he wants. A little push for basic competency and then helping him follow his chosen path is what is required. If and when he gets serious, you will also have to…that is where I am (kicking and screaming) with a 11 km commute. One way. 4 times a week. Enjoy it! Helps here to have a music/tabla teacher coming home.

    The pain with parenting isn’t the kids. It is other parents! πŸ˜€

  4. Sangi, you are always an inspiration! After reading your comment, I realised how true it is – The pain with parenting isn’t the kids. It is other parents!

    My kid is not competitive – yet. He is very happy as long as he has people around him and he is playing. There has to be some focus and determination and until then as parents we will keep exposing him to all we can think of.

    11km commute each way in blr traffic – all the best to you! But if son wants it – I’m sure he will excel in it.

  5. I hear you!! I think the competitive thing comes with age too as kids do things for fun only till certain age. Once into tween or teen they don’t seem to have much fun with any activity except for watching TV or reading books or such things.. My school of thought is to expose them to everything so that if they really like something they can pick it up from somewhere in the middle rather than starting from scratch..

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